Joseph’s Dreams Came True

Key Passage: Genesis 28:15 “Look, I am with you and will watch over you wherever you go.”

Big Picture Question: Why did God send Joseph to Egypt? God sent Joseph to Egypt to save his family.

Christ Connection: Joseph recognized that though his brothers intended evil, God planned his circumstances for good—to establish a remnant of God’s people (Genesis 45:7). Likewise, though those who crucified Jesus intended it for evil, God’s plan for the sacrifice of His Son was for the good of all people. Through Jesus’ death on the cross, God again saved a remnant of people.

Dear Parent(s) or Guardian(s),

This week The Gospel Project for Kids continued the two-part story looking at a Joseph, a son of David. Joseph had come to a position of power in Egypt, and there was a famine throughout the world. Joseph had plenty of food, and people came to him for it. When Joseph’s brothers arrived for food, Joseph recognized them and tested them to see if their hearts had changed.

Joseph determined that God had used the evil intent of his brothers to bring about His glory and Joseph’s good. Joseph revealed his identity to his brothers, and Jacob and his family moved from Israel to Egypt.

Joseph recognized that though his brothers intended evil, God planned his circumstances for good to establish a remnant of God’s people (Genesis 45:7). Likewise, although those who crucified Jesus intended evil, God’s plan for the sacrifice of His Son was for the good of all people. Through Jesus’ death on the cross, God again saved a remnant of people.

Family Activity: Talk about what it must have been like for Jacob’s family to have no food. Gather food to donate to a food pantry, or volunteer at a soup kitchen as a family.

Joseph Sent to Egypt

Key Passage: Genesis 28:15 “Look, I am with you and will watch over you wherever you go.”

Big Picture Question: Who is always with us? God is always with us.

Christ Connection: God sent Joseph to Egypt and blessed him, so that he rose to a position of great power. In that position, he was God’s instrument for saving his family and many others in the world from death by starvation. Jesus gave up his position of great power to be God’s instrument for saving people. Christ’s life and death made a way to save people from spiritual death, which is the penalty of sin.

Dear Parent(s) or Guardian(s),

What a blessing to have another week of The Gospel Project for Kids! This week we started a two-part story looking at Joseph, a son of Jacob. Joseph’s father favored him above all of his other sons. Their relationship bred contempt and jealousy among his siblings. Joseph’s brothers threw him into a pit.

Before long, Joseph’s brothers had a plan. They pulled Joseph out of the pit to sell him into slavery. Joseph traveled to Egypt and became a servant in the home of a prominent Egyptian named Potiphar. Accused of a crime he did not commit, Joseph spent the next several years in prison. God was watching out for him though; Joseph excelled and was released from prison after God gave him the ability to interpret one of Pharaoh’s dreams.

Because of the interpretation of Pharaoh’s dream, Joseph rose to be the second highest ruler in the country. He built silos to house grain and administered the distribution of food during a time of famine.

God was with Joseph, and He blessed him. Joseph rose to his position as God’s instrument to protect his family and many others from starvation. Jesus gave up His position of great power in order to bring salvation to people. Christ’s life, death, and resurrection made a way to provide salvation from spiritual death, the penalty for sin.

Family Activity: Think of a family going through a tough time. Spend time praying for them as a family. Serve a family by running their errands, dropping off a meal, or helping out in their yard.

Jacob’s New Name

Key Passage: Genesis 28:15 “Look, I am with you and will watch over you wherever you go.”

Big Picture Question: What new name did God give Jacob? God changed Jacob’s name to Israel.

Christ Connection: Jacob’s meeting with God changed his life as reflected in his new name, Israel. Jesus came so that we might have a changed life, forgiven of sin (2 Cor. 5:17). Jesus’ death and resurrection provided sinful people with the way to be adopted into God’s family. When we are adopted into the family of god we also receive a new name—children of God (John 1:12).

Dear Parent(s) or Guardian(s),

This week in The Gospel Project for Kids, kids heard a story about what happens when God changes someone’s heart. Jacob, you may remember, didn’t start off very well. He was a lying deceiver who looked out only for his own interests. Nevertheless, God changed Jacob through quite a challenging circumstance.

Jacob separated from his brother and lived away for 20 years. During that time he had a family—a very large family! God compelled Jacob to return to his hometown in order to see Esau. Jacob learned that Esau was coming but that he had a large contingent of men with him. Jacob sent his family ahead of him and camped by a river.

During the night, Jacob wrestled with an angel who turned out to be God. In that meeting with God, God changed Jacob. In the morning, Jacob crossed the river. Instead of hiding behind his family in case Esau’s approaching group attacked, Jacob led his family to what was a glorious reunion.

Jacob’s meeting with God changed his life as reflected in his new name, Israel. Jesus came so that we might have a changed life, forgiven of sin (2 Cor. 5:17). Jesus’ death and resurrection provided sinful people with the way to be adopted into God’s family. When we are adopted into the family of God, we also receive a new name—children of God (John 1:12).

Family Activity: Conduct a family arm wrestling competition. Remind kids that Jacob wrestled with God and Jacobs wouldn’t let God go until He blessed Jacob. Look online to discover the meaning of each family member’s name. discuss if the name is a good fit for each person.

Jesus’ Crucifixion and Resurrection

Key Passage: Luke 24:46 “This is what is written: The Messiah will suffer and rise from the dead on the third day”

Big Picture Question: What did Jesus do for sinners? Jesus died on the cross and is alive

Christ Connection: The most important thing that ever happened is that Jesus died and was raised from the dead. Jesus never did anything wrong, but He took our punishment because we sinned. God forgives us for sin because Jesus died for us. God raised Jesus from the dead to be King over everything.

Dear Parents,

Jesus is alive! Thank you for entrusting your child to us throughout this year. We celebrate with you and your family the joy of Easter. This week’s story in The Gospel Project for Kids® was all about Jesus’ death on the cross and His resurrection three days later.

Why did Jesus have to die? God is just and requires due payment for sin. To simply forgive without receiving a payment would be unjust. The wages of sin is death. (Rom. 6:23) Jesus came to earth was to save us from our sin (Matt. 1:21), to show God’s
love to us (Rom. 5:7-8), and to give those who believe in Him eternal life (John 3:16). Jesus came to die so that
we would be forgiven (Eph. 1:7), and to bring us to God (1 Pet. 3:18).

Jesus’ resurrection proved that God accepted Jesus’ death as payment for our sins. Jesus’ crucifixion and
resurrection are not the end of the story, but the climax. Pray with your family, thanking God for sending His
Son, Jesus, to be the Savior of the world.

Family Activity: Look at a cross on a necklace or other item found in your home. Ask kids to tell you in their own words why the cross is used as a decoration today. Remind kids tat the cross is a reminder of what Jesus did for us y dying on the cross and rising again three days later. Review Matthew 26:36-28:10. We deserve to die for our sin, but Jesus died in our place so that our sins might be forgiven, and we may have new life through His power to conquer sin and death.

The Stolen Blessing

Key Passage: Genesis 28:15 “Look, I am with you and will watch over you wherever you go.”

Big Picture Question: What can stop God’s plans? Nothing can stop God’s plans.

Christ Connection: Jacob is a perfect example of why a Savior was needed. Like Jacob, we seek a birthright and blessing that is not ours, but we cannot lie, deceive, or trick to receive it. Instead Jesus shared his birthright and blessing with us when He paid for our sins on the cross and gave us His righteousness.

Dear Parent(s) or Guardian(s),

The Gospel Project for Kids continued its journey through God’s story by learning about a little sibling rivalry. Any child with a sibling can attest to the struggles that sometimes plague this special relationship. Jacob and Esau were no different. Jacob’s name means “heel grabber,” an apt description of who and what he was.

Esau despised his birthright in favor of some tasty stew that Jacob was making. The birthright was an important right in Hebrew culture, and for Esau to look on it with disdain was contrary to all that it was designed to do. Jacob took advantage of his brother and secured for himself a better familial position.

Jacob is a perfect example of why people need a Savior. He tricked his father into blessing him instead of his brother. Jacob lied and was a devious manipulator to gain something that wasn’t rightfully his. Like Jacob, we seek a birthright and a blessing that don’t belong to us, but we can’t lie, cheat, or deceive in order to gain it. Instead, Jesus shared His birthright and blessing with us when He paid for our sins on the cross and gave us His righteousness.

Family Activity: Talk about a time when it was hard to trust that God was working out His perfect plan.

The Promise Reaffirmed

Key Passage: Genesis 28:15 “Look, I am with you and will watch over you wherever you go.”

Big Picture Question: How did people know God’s plan? God told people His plan.

Christ Connection: God’s wonderful plan to Abraham extended well beyond his lifetime. The plan was shared with Rebekah, Isaac, Jacob, and eventually an entire nation leading to the birth of a baby boy named Jesus. Jesus fulfilled God’s plan to provide salvation and redemption for all of God’s people.

Dear Parent(s) or Guardian(s),

In the next installment of God’s story, we will learn that God’s plan that began with Abraham extended far beyond his lifetime. When Isaac grew up, he started a family of his own. Isaac’s wife, Rebekah, had twin boys, Jacob and Esau.

Today’s story is about the promise God gave Abraham. Abraham passed the knowledge of the promise to Isaac, who told the promise to his son, Jacob. In order to reaffirm the promise, God gave the promise to both Isaac and Jacob.

God’s plan didn’t stop with the promise He gave to Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob. The promise was extended to Jacob’s descendants—and ultimately to an entire nation—leading to the birth of a baby boy named Jesus. Jesus fulfilled God’s plan to provide salvation and redemption for all of God’s people.

Family Activity: Use some free, online genealogy tools to search for family ancestors. Draw a family tree and explain the concept of descendants.

God Tested Abraham

Key Passage: Genesis 17:1 “I will keep My covenant between Me and you…to be your God.”

Big Picture Question: How can we show we believe God’s plan? We obey God.

Christ Connection: Abraham showed his faith in God when he was willing to sacrifice Isaac. Isaac also showed he was ready to do what his father said. This is a clear picture of God who was willing to sacrifice His only Son, and of Jesus who was willing to do what was necessary for God’s plan of salvation. Isaac’s life was spared because God provided a substitute. We need a perfect sacrifice as our substitute for sin. God provided a perfect sacrifice in His Son, Jesus Christ.

Dear Parent(s) or Guardian(s),

God’s story continued this week in The Gospel Project for Kids with the story of God testing Abraham. Imagine being Abraham, trusted in old age with the son God had promised. Now God instructs you to offer your son as a sacrifice. What would go through your mind? The sacrifice of a child was not common among God’s followers, but Abraham obeyed God.

Think about your children. Not only was Abraham obedient to God, Isaac was obedient to his father, likely not knowing what was happening but trusting that his father knew what was best. Isaac was willing and ready to do what his father asked him to do.

God provided a ram as a sacrifice instead of Isaac. This story is a clear depiction of what God was willing to do when He sent Jesus as the sacrifice for the sins of mankind. Jesus was willing to do what was necessary for God’s plan to succeed. God spared Isaac by providing a substitute. Likewise, we need a perfect substitute for our sin; that substitute is Jesus.

Family Activity: Guide kids to complete someone else’s chore. Remind them God sent Jesus to pay our penalty for sin as a substitute.

The Sons of Abraham

Key Passage: Genesis 17:1 “I will keep My covenant between Me and you…to be your God.”

Big Picture Question: Who always keeps His promises? God always keeps His promises.

Christ Connection: God fulfilled His promise to Abraham by giving him a son. Isaac was the hope of Abraham and Sarah for a future and a legacy. God fulfilled His promise to the world by giving us His Son. Jesus ultimately fulfilled God’s promise to Abraham, and He is the hope of the world for salvation and redemption.

Dear Parent(s) or Guardian(s),

This week in The Gospel Project for Kids, we heard the story of Abraham’s sons! That’s right, two sons!

Abraham and Sarah took into their own hands the fulfillment of God’s promise to bring a son into the world. God, as always, did not need their help—only their faithfulness.

God fulfilled His promise to Abraham, but only in His timing, not Abraham’s. Isaac was the hope of Abraham and Sarah for a future. The ultimate fulfillment of God’s promise to Abraham is the person of Jesus Christ. Jesus is the hope of the world for salvation and redemption.

Family Activity: At the beginning of the week, encourage each family member to make a promise to God (to pray each day, memorize a Bible verse, show someone God’s love, read the Bible every day, and so forth). Write the promise below for each family member. At the end of the week, share and document how well each person did at keeping their promise. Talk about how God always keeps His promises.

God’s Covenant with Abraham

Key Passage: Genesis 17:1 “I will keep My covenant between Me and you…to be your God.”

Big Picture Question: Why did God choose Abraham? God chose Abraham to be part of His plan.

Christ Connection: God chose Abraham to be the father of the nation in which Jesus would be born. In this way, Abraham would bless all nations, as God had promised. God also saw Abraham’s faith in God’s promises and counted it as righteous. It is our faith in Jesus’ perfect righteousness that brings salvation to God’s people.

Dear Parent(s) or Guardian(s),

We had another great week at The Gospel Project for Kids. Today your kids learned that when sin entered the world, God already had a plan to provide a Savior. God’s plan to provide a redeemer for His people began through the person of Abraham.

God called Abraham to move away from his home and land to a place that God Himself would show him. Abraham obeyed and God would use Abraham to bless all people, even you and me. Abraham had much faith in the promise God had given him, and God credited Abraham’s faith as righteousness.

Kids heard that all people are sinners, but through the family of Abraham, God sent His Son Jesus, who never sinned, to bring salvation to God’s people. Boys and girls learned that through the family of Abraham, Jesus was born.

Family Activity: Try to count the stars on a clear night. Remind kids that God always keeps his promises. Write a prayer to thank God for being faithful.

Job

Key Passage: Genesis 1:27 “So God created mankind in his own image, in the image of God he created them; male and female he created them.”

Big Picture Question: Who is all-powerful? God is all-powerful.

Christ Connection: Job’s suffering and his request for a mediator give us a glimpse of our Savior, Jesus. Neither Job nor Jesus experienced suffering because they had sinned. Unlike Job, Jesus never questioned why He had to suffer. Jesus understood that we needed Him to pay the price for our sin and be our mediator before God.

Dear Parent(s) or Guardian(s),

This week in The Gospel Project for Kids, we heard the story of Job! It might seem strange to present the story of Job this early in the chronology of Scripture, but most biblical authorities believe, based on subject matter and language, that Job was a contemporary of the patriarchs. Job fits chronologically into this period of history.

The story of Job helps Christians see that God alone is all-powerful, sovereign, and good. Job’s story is one all people can relate to, as everyone will suffer in his or her lifetime. God’s dialogue with Job reveals His characteristics clearly.

Throughout all of Job’s suffering, Job never stopped trusting God. Listen to Job’s response to God’s questions: “I am so insignificant. How can I answer You?” (Job 40:4) Job didn’t understand his suffering, but he understood who God is.

While the Book of Job speaks volumes to the problem of human suffering, it is also an important picture of how a suffering person should relate to God. Though Job sometimes doubted God, he never turned away. Job’s suffering actually brought him closer to God.

Kids discovered the true Suffering Servant, Jesus, who was truly innocent. He suffered greatly so that we could be brought closer to God in our suffering. The Bible says Christians will suffer in their lifetimes, and Job reminds us that following Jesus is worth it. God is all-powerful, sovereign, and good. We can trust Him when we don’t understand the pain we experience. At the cross, God used the ultimate pain to bring about the ultimate good: our future and final salvation from sin.

Family Activity: Find a way for your family to help someone who is less fortunate. Volunteer at a soup kitchen, or run a clothing drive. Talk to your family about how God’s goodness flows from Jesus through us!