Key Passage: Zephaniah 3:17 “The Lord your God is in your midst, a mighty one who will save; he will rejoice over you with gladness; he will quiet you by his love; he will exult over you with loud singing.”

Big Picture Question: What does God want us to do? God wants us to obey Him because we love Him.

Christ Connection: Micah had good news for God’s people. A leader was coming who would save them. He would take care of them and lead them. Jesus is the perfect ruler God promised.

Dear Parents,
Thank you for continuing this journey of The Gospel Project® for Kids. In this unit, kids will be learning about prophets sent to the Southern Kingdom of Judah. In today’s Bible story, the prophet Micah—whose name means “Who is like Yahweh?”—poses that very question: “Who is a God like You, removing iniquity and passing over rebellion for the remnant of His inheritance?” (Micah 7:18)
Micah was a prophet from Moresheth, a city in the foothills of Judah. He testified to God’s character. God’s message to Micah came hundreds of years before Jesus was born—in the days when Jotham was king of Judah, through the time of King Ahaz, and up to the rule of King Hezekiah. God’s message was about the current state of affairs in Samaria and Jerusalem. Samaria was the capital of the Northern Kingdom of Israel, and Jerusalem was the capital of the Southern Kingdom of Judah. Israel and Judah were corrupt. A period of economic wealth gave way to idolatry, theft, false prophecies, and a love of evil.
Micah addressed the sins of the people—specifically the mistreatment of the poor—and warned of the Lord’s coming judgment. One day, Micah said, God would send a Messiah, have compassion on Israel, and preserve a remnant by which He would keep His promise to Abraham. (See Micah 7:20; Genesis 22:15-18.) The prophet Micah gave God’s people a message of hope: a leader was coming who would free God’s people. He would be a shepherd and a king. The righteous ruler promised through Micah is the Lord Jesus Christ.

Family Activity: During the week, write Micah 6:8 on index cards and post them throughout the house. Encourage each family member to memorize the verse. At the end of the week, see who can recite the verse the fastest, the quietest, the loudest, with the funniest voice, and so forth. Then, spend a few minutes talking about what the verse means and how our love for God should motivate us to obey.

Key Passage: Isaiah 53:6 “We all, like sheep, have gone astray, each of us has turned to our own way; and the Lord has laid on him the iniquity of us all.”

Big Picture Question: Whom did Isaiah preach about? Isaiah preached about Jesus.

Christ Connection: God planned a very long time ago that Jesus would die on the cross for our sins. Many, many years before Jesus was born, Isaiah wrote about what Jesus would do. Jesus died to save people from sin.

Dear Parents,

Today’s Bible story in the The Gospel Project® for Kids focuses on the four servant songs in the Book of Isaiah. These songs describe the working out of God’s plan of redemption through the innocent substitute—the Messiah—who would suffer for the sake of sinners. Through the Messiah, God would bring sinners back to Himself.

The fourth and final Servant song is found in Isaiah 53. Isaiah provides an answer to the question, How can a just God justify the ungodly? How can He declare innocent those who are guilty? How can He love people like us? A just God can’t just look the other way. That’s cheap grace. Sin against God is a big deal. God didn’t just forgive our sins, He dealt with them. The price? God’s own Son.

Jesus fulfilled Isaiah’s prophecies of a suffering servant. People assumed God had cursed Jesus for His own sins, but Jesus was sinless. “He was pierced because of our transgressions, crushed because of our iniquities; punishment for our peace was on Him.”

God planned a very long time ago that Jesus would die on the cross for our sins. Seven hundred years before Jesus was born, the prophet Isaiah wrote that this would happen! Jesus was the servant who suffered so that those who trust in Him could be forgiven.

Family Activity: Talk to your kids about situations where people make predictions (before sports games, about the weather, etc.) Explain the difference between those and Isaiah’s prophecies.

Go further: Set up a homemade bowling game or play with marbles. Observe how the pins or marbles go in all directions when they are hit. If you play on a table, they may fall of the edge. Read the key passage and talk about what happens when everyone goes his own way instead of obeying God’s laws, causing chaos.

Key Passage: Isaiah 53:6 “We all, like sheep, have gone astray, each of us has turned to our own way; and the Lord has laid on him the iniquity of us all.”

Big Picture Question: What can you do when you are scared? I can pray to God for help.

Christ Connection: Hezekiah was a good king. He led the people of Judah to love and worship God. But even good kings sin. Jesus is our faithful king. Jesus never sinned. Jesus will come back to earth to make everything right. He is our King forever.

Dear Parents,

Thank you for continuing this journey of The Gospel Project® for Kids. Today’s Bible study continues to look at Isaiah’s prophetic ministry, this time during the reign of King Hezekiah, the son of King Ahaz.

King Ahaz had not been a good king. Ahaz had not respected God’s law, or God’s prophets. Ahaz worshiped idols. King Hezekiah, however, “did what was right in the Lord’s sight just as his ancestor David had done.” (See 2 Chron. 29.) The Lord was with Hezekiah, and Hezekiah prospered. Over time, Hezekiah’s wealth and success led to pride. How did Hezekiah react when God said everything in His house would be carried off to Babylon? “Who cares? I’ll be dead by then.”

Hezekiah was a faithful king who led the people of Judah to worship God like they were supposed to. But even good kings are sinners. Jesus is our faithful King who never sinned. One day He will return to make all things the way they are supposed to be. Jesus is our King forever.

Family Activity: List things you would like for people to say about you when you are not there to hear. Read 2 Kings 18:5-7. The Bible says King Hezekiah obeyed God and God was with him. Hezekiah made mistakes, but we remember him as a good king.